What did the very early toilets look like in castles?

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Buford Johnson asked a question: What did the very early toilets look like in castles?
Asked By: Buford Johnson
Date created: Fri, Feb 12, 2021 4:08 AM
Date updated: Fri, Jul 1, 2022 9:57 PM

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Video answer: Victorian realities - how did they use the toilet??!

Victorian realities - how did they use the toilet??!

Top best answers to the question «What did the very early toilets look like in castles»

In a medieval castle, a garderobe was usually a simple hole discharging to the outside into a cesspit (akin to a pit latrine) or the moat (like a fish pond toilet), depending on the structure of the building.

Video answer: Exploring an abandoned 1870 victorian house north durham

Exploring an abandoned 1870 victorian house north durham

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Medieval castles in Europe were fitted with private toilets known as ‘garderobes’ (example pictured above), typically featuring stone seats above tall holes draining into moats. Communal latrines with many seats were installed in medieval British abbeys.

Underneath that was a layer of coarse, sand-like type of soil. The very bottom layer had a lot of white granite and other leftover rocks from all the stones they had been cutting for years. This drainage system was so advanced that it was probably the best one in the world during that time period.

Essentially, castles were at the heart of Medieval society. Castles were built in England and Wales after 1066. They cemented a new social system of feudalism in place. Each new castle secured the power of the local lord over his vassals. To serve the lord, most castles would have been places of frenzied domestic activity.

A Brief (and Very British) History of Workplace Bathrooms. From the toilets of the Romans to those of Amazon warehouse employees, workplace bathrooms reveal a lot about the distribution of power. For more than 200 years, Vercovicium was one of 15 Roman forts that dotted Hadrian’s Wall, 73 miles of turf and stone that stretched from the River ...

In most households, including early castles, cooking was done on an open hearth in the middle of the main living area, to make efficient use of the heat. This was the most common arrangement for most of the Middle Ages, so the kitchen was combined with the dining hall.

Some toilets had a window to let in fresh air, which for the same reason was not shuttered like other windows of a castle. The floor may have been scattered with rushes and aromatic herbs and flowers, just as the Great Hall of the castle was, to deter vermin and offer a more pleasant fragrance than the users could provide.

The chamber pot, a portable basin, was used in Medieval times. It is exactly what you think it is and was used exactly the way you think it would be. I think they looked like a big box with a hole ...

During the Middle Ages, rich people built toilets called 'garderobes' jutting out of the sides of their castles. A hole in the bottom let everything just drop into a pit or the moat. © Dave Dunford

One of the centuries-old castle latrines (read: ancient toilet), they found, was still full of dried-up poo. That feces, they thought, could provide valuable insight into what kind of parasites ...

The invention of some of the first simple toilets is credited to Mesopotamia in the late fourth millennium bc 1. These non-flushing affairs were pits about 4.5 metres deep, lined with a stack of...

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Video answer: 15 medieval hygiene practices that might make you queasy

15 medieval hygiene practices that might make you queasy